JCPS Summer School Sees Its Highest Enrollment

PROGRAMS. AS WLKY’S LAUREN ADAMS REPORTS, THE DISTRICT EXCEEDED ITS GOAL. REPORTER: HERE AT GREENWOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IS NOT EXACTLY OUT FOR SUMMER, THE CORRIDORS ARE GOOD. THE DINING ROOM IS NOISY, AND HANDS ARE RISING AS STUDENTS WAIT TO BE CALLED. IT’S THE SECOND WEEK OF SUMMER SCHOOL. >> IT HAS BEEN SO EXCITING TO BE ABLE TO BRING STUDENTS ACROSS THE DISTRICT, ACROSS COMMUNITIES TO GET STUDENTS BACK INTO CLASSROOMS, TO HAVE SUMMER LEARNING. JENNIFER: DOES REPORTER: JCPS SAYS THIS IS THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF ENROLLMENTS THEY HAVE HAD, WITH MORE THAN 10,000 STUDENTS TAKING PART IN ABOUT A DOZEN DIFFERENT PROGRAMS, EVEN LEARNING TO FENCING AND PLAYING CHESS. THANKS TO SUMMER BACKPACK LEAGUE AND LIT PROGRAMS. >> DURING THE SUMMER, I LOVE HOW THEY DO FUN ACTIVITIES, BUT WE ALSO LEARN TOO. JOURNALIST: AND FOR STUDENTS LIKE AUBREY BAILEY ENTERING GRADE 4 THIS YEAR, THIS IS A CHANCE TO CATCH UP POST-COVID, WHEN LEARNING WAS ONLINE. EVEN LAST YEAR WAS A HYBRID MODEL WITH 3000 CHILDREN AT HOME TO DO SUMMER SCHOOL. THIS IS NOT THE CASE THIS YEAR. TEACHERS TELL US WHAT HAPPENS IN BUILDINGS LIKE THIS CANNOT BE MATCHED. GRADE 5 TEACHER KARYN STATON, WHO HAS TEACHED SUMMER SCHOOL FOR NEARLY TWO DECADES, SAYS EXTRA CARE IN AND OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE. >> IT GIVES THEM THE OPPORTUNITY WHERE TO GO AND ENGAGE. THEY ARE ENTERTAINED AND HAVE A GOOD TIME AND THEY WANT TO COME BACK. JOURNALIST: AND THIS YEAR, IT’S 10,000 CHILDREN WHO NOT ONLY HAVE FUN BUT PREPARE BETTER F

JCPS Summer School Sees Its Highest Enrollment

Through the Summer Backpack League and LIT programs, over 10,000 students are continuing to learn this summer.

At Greenwood Elementary, school isn’t exactly out for the summer. The hallways are crowded, the dining hall is noisy, and hands go up as impatient students wait to be called. It’s the second week of summer school. “I tell you, it was so exciting to be able to bring students across the district, across communities to be able to have students in classrooms again, to be able to have summer learning,” Michelle Dillard , assistant superintendent of teaching and learning at JCPS, said. JCPS says this is the highest number of registrations they have had. More than 10,000 students participate in a dozen different programs, even learning to fencing and play chess, thanks to the Summer Backpack League and LIT programs. Bailey, a future fourth grader, said. For students like Aubrey, it’s also a chance to catch up post-COVID-19, when learning was online for over a year. Even last year, summer school was a hybrid of sorts. According to the district, 3,000 students stayed home and took summer classes online. That is not the case this year, as summer school and programs have returned fully in-person. , to be engaged and not necessarily sitting in a classroom. They’re up, they’re engaged, they’re having a great time and they want to come back,” Staton said. JCPS’s Summer Backpack League and LIT programs last four weeks.

At Greenwood Elementary, school isn’t exactly out for the summer. The hallways are crowded, the dining hall is noisy, and hands go up as impatient students wait to be called. It’s the second week of summer school.

“I’m telling you, it’s been so exciting to be able to bring students across the district, into all the communities to be able to have students in the classrooms again, to be able to have summer learning,” Michelle Dillard , the assistant superintendent of teaching and learning at JCPS, said.

JCPS says this is the highest number of registrations they have had. More than 10,000 students participate in a dozen different programs, even learning to fencing and play chess, thanks to the Summer Backpack League and LIT programs.

“I like how they do fun activities, but we also learn,” said future fourth-grader Aubrey Bailey.

For students like Aubrey, it’s also a chance to catch up after COVID-19, when learning was online for over a year.

Even last year, summer school was kind of a hybrid. According to the district, 3,000 students stayed home and took summer classes online. That is not the case this year, as summer school and programs have returned fully in-person.

Karyn Staton, a fifth-grade teacher, said the extra attention inside and outside the classroom can’t be matched.

“It gives them the opportunity to have a place to go, to engage and not necessarily sit in a classroom. They’re up, they’re engaged, they’re having a good time and they want to come back.” , Staton said. said.

JCPS’s Summer Backpack League and LIT programs last four weeks.

Norma A. Roth